Healthcare Quarterly

Healthcare Quarterly 21(Special Issue) December 2018 : 12-30.doi:10.12927/hcq.2018.25642
Supporting Engagement-Capable Environments

Supporting Patient and Family Engagement for Healthcare Improvement: Reflections on “Engagement-Capable Environments” Pan-Canadian Learning Collaboratives

Carol Fancott, G. Ross Baker, Maria Judd, Anya Humphrey and Angela Morin

Abstract

Although the involvement of patients in their care has been central to the concept of patient-centred care, patient engagement in the realms of health professional education, policy making, governance, research and healthcare improvement has been rapidly evolving in Canada in the past decade. The Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) has supported healthcare organizations across Canada to meaningfully partner with patients in quality improvement and system redesign efforts. This article describes CFHI initiatives to enhance patient engagement efforts across Canada and the lessons learned in the context of “engagement-capable environments” and offers reflections for the future of patient engagement in Canada.  

Version française

Key Messages

  1. Patient and family engagement learning collaboratives have supported healthcare organizations across Canada on their journey to create engagement-capable environments and to meaningfully partner with patients in their improvement efforts.
  2. Patient engagement efforts have evolved over the past decade in all realms of healthcare, but further evaluation is needed to better understand the mechanisms of what works and why and with what impact.
  3. Human connection and relationships are fundamental to patient engagement efforts. 

 

Introduction 

Healthcare systems around the world are responding to the demand of “nothing about me, without me”1 as they attempt to operationalize patient- and family-centred care in practice by more actively engaging patients in their care. More broadly, in the realms of education, research, policy making and quality improvement, patient engagement efforts continue to grow. For example, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research-funded Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (CIHR 2018) has set new expectations for researchers to work together with users of the health system and to determine priorities for research and for patients2 and the public to be actively involved throughout the research enterprise, not simply as participants in studies but as partners in the process. In the health professions, education efforts such as those at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Montreal (Karazivan et al. 2015) have led the way in how patients are embedded as partners in training the next generation of physicians and healthcare professionals to engender collaborative and compassionate care in practice. Healthcare organizations worldwide have endeavoured to tap into the expertise and wisdom of patients and their families to use their experience to drive improvements in the safety and quality of care. Patient-centred care as a domain of quality is incentivized in different systems around the world using a variety of levers (e.g., legislative requirements, accreditation standards), and delivery organizations increasingly recognize that enhancing the patient experience and outcomes of care requires actively involving patients in the design and implementation of these improvements. 

In Canada, the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI), a not-for-profit, federally funded organization dedicated to accelerating healthcare improvement and system transformation, has identif ied the engagement of patients and citizens as one of the key six levers in its improvement framework (Figure 1).

FIGURE 1. CFHI’s six levers (or enablers) for accelerating healthcare improvement

Figure 1

CFHI = Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement.

Engaging patients, families and communities to drive health system change and improvement is a strategic focus and is foundational to the activities and programming across the organization. This paper briefly describes the approach CFHI has taken since 2010 to support healthcare organizations across Canada to meaningfully partner with patients and families in quality improvement and system redesign in four pan-Canadian learning initiatives. The concept of “engagement-capable environments” (Baker and Denis 2011; Baker et al. 2016a) has emerged from research conducted in the initial engagement collaboratives and other CFHI-supported work with organizations that have had success in creating positive engagement experiences and outcomes for patients. This paper also considers the evolution of the field of patient engagement and CFHI’s own growth as an organization in its aim to become an engagement-capable environment. We conclude this paper with reflections on the future of patient engagement and what we may offer as a national organization to accelerate healthcare improvements where patients and families are integral to these efforts. 

CFHI’s Approach to Engagement and Programming

CFHI adapted and adopted a definition by Tambuyzer and colleagues to provide clarity to its engagement work: “Patient engagement is the involvement of patients and/or family members in decision-making and active participation in a range of activities (e.g., planning, evaluation, care, research, training, and recruitment). Starting from the premise of expertise by experience, patient engagement involves collaboration and partnership with professionals” (Tambuyzer et al. 2014). The continuum of public participation noted by the International Association for Public Participation (2015) (e.g., from inform, consult, involve, collaborate and empower) provides clarity as the continuum of participation relates to the public (or patient) influence on decision-making. The engagement framework offered by Carman and colleagues provides further insights by also offering a continuum of engagement (e.g., consult, involve, partner/share leadership) as well as considerations for the level of engagement efforts made at the direct level of care, the program/organizational level and policy making (Carman et al. 2013). CFHI’s efforts have focused primarily on engaging patients at the meso and macro levels – that is, supporting patient engagement at the program/organizational levels for improvement efforts and within policy that supports patient-centred practices, with the ultimate goal of improving patient experiences and outcomes of care. 

CFHI’s four learning initiatives and collaboratives have included 51 teams in eight provinces and one territory across Canada, with the overall goal of developing organizational capacity for patient and family engagement (see Table 1 for details of each of the four learning cohorts). When CFHI launched its first initiative of “Patient Engagement Projects” (PEPs) in 2010, the idea of patient-centred care had already been firmly established as one of the key dimensions of quality (Institute of Medicine 2001). Moreover, patient advisory or user councils had been entrenched in some areas of care (e.g., pediatrics) and in some jurisdictions (e.g., Quebec). However, the concept of more active engagement with patients, particularly at organizational levels for improvement, was in its infancy in Canada. As a result, many teams in this first CFHI cohort focused on building the infrastructure required for more intensive engagement efforts. Collectively, together with CFHI, teams learned how to engage with patients in meaningful ways, involving patients more intentionally throughout their improvement work. In subsequent collaboratives, CFHI encouraged engagement practices further across the continuum of patient participation, to allow for more collaborative models to develop between patients and providers on improvement teams. Teams within these initial learning initiatives spanned health sectors across the continuum of care (e.g., primary care, home care, acute and subacute care) and populations of interest (e.g., pediatrics, oncology care, orthopedics, chronic disease) and focused on a wide range of improvement initiatives (e.g., transitions in care, admission and discharge processes, development of resources in primary care for patient engagement). In our most recent engagement collaborative, we focused more intentionally on the implementation of a specific policy initiative related to family presence while at the same time embedding patient and family involvement in its development, implementation and evaluation.

The model for these learning collaboratives has evolved over these four cohorts of teams to include regular learning opportunities offered face-to-face and via webinar, peer-to-peer learning, coaching support, networking opportunities and seed funding. In our most recent “Better Together e-collaborative,” we tested a virtual learning model and offered coaching, education and networking opportunities for teams to advance their policy initiatives together with patients and families. The inclusion of patient advisors as coaches and faculty is an advancement made in recent collaboratives to further support teams in their engagement efforts and to help them consider the purpose, roles and expectations for engagement together with patients.

The methods and focus of evaluation of CFHI patient engagement programs have also evolved over time, with increased learning about both the processes and the outcomes of engagement. CFHI has employed and tested numerous approaches to gain insights into what works and why for engagement processes and with what impact. As the field of engagement was emerging at the time of the initial two PEP initiatives, a qualitative approach to evaluation was employed to gain an in-depth understanding of engagement methods employed by teams, the processes used to integrate patients’ voices and how the organizational context enabled or acted as a barrier to engagement efforts. Through this qualitative study, we began to develop a deeper understanding of what it meant for teams to engage with patients. This research also underlined the importance of organizational contexts that enabled teams to engage in meaningful ways. Teams in organizations with strong and visible senior leadership support were able to develop and sustain a patient-centred philosophy of care, creating a more mature context in which they were able to employ more sophisticated engagement strategies, moving along the continuum of involvement toward “co-design” activities (McIntosh-Murray et al. 2013). In these organizations, patients worked in partnership with providers to learn quality improvement methods, assess opportunities for improvement and design solutions together, enhancing both the patient experience of care and the provider’s experience of delivering care, as well as other quality outcomes.

Building on these research findings, the subsequent patient and family engagement collaboratives specifically focused on embedding patient advisors into quality improvement teams to work with providers and leaders in developing and implementing improvement initiatives.  

TABLE 1. Summary of four CFHI learning initiatives/collaboratives in patient and family engagement

Project
Patient Engagement Projects (PEPs) I
Patient Engagement Projects (PEPs) II
Partnering with Patients and Families for QI (PFEC)
Better Together (part of larger campaign)
Aim
Promote and support engagement of patients in the design, delivery and evaluation of health services that lead to high-quality patient-centred care
Promote and support intervention projects that engage patients in the design, delivery and evaluation of health services that lead to high-quality, patient-centred care
Build capacity to enhance organizational culture to partner with patients and families to improve quality across the healthcare continuum
Build organizational capacity to assess, plan, implement, evaluate and sustain family presence and introduce the practices that support patient- and family-centred care in hospitals to improve patient and staff experiences and satisfaction 
Duration
24 months
24 months
17 months
11 months
Seed funding
Up to $100K
Up to $100K
Up to $50K
No seed funding
Teams accepted
10 teams (4 provinces)
7 teams (5 provinces)
22 teams (6 provinces, 1 territory)
12 teams (7 provinces)
Evaluation approach
Qualitative research (interviews, document review)
Qualitative research (interviews, document review)
Team surveys, social network analysis, document review, collaborative assessment scale, interviews
Surveys, document review, collaborative assessment scale, interviews

CFHI = Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement; PFEC = Patient and Family Engagement Collaborative; QI = quality improvement. 

Evaluation efforts focused on gaining a better understanding of how integrating patient advisors influenced team functioning, using evaluation methods such as social network analysis (Valente 2010) and an assessment of team experience and effectiveness (Orchard et al. 2012; Shortell et al. 2004). These approaches examined the perspectives of all team members, including patient advisors, to build an understanding of how teams functioned with advisors as team members. Edmondson et al. (2001) observed that teams go through a learning process when establishing new routines. Successful teams pay attention to member selection and preparation, create psychological safety for trying new practices, test new routines and reflect on their experiences. Organizational contexts were explored using interviews and focus groups with patients, families and team members to provide a more nuanced understanding of roles and an organizational context for this work. The evaluation also captured team outcomes of the projects, as well as capacity and knowledge gained in areas of quality improvement, change management and engagement practices. This mixed-methods approach to evaluation thus provided the multi-dimensional view of engagement and organizational practices required for teams to partner with patients in meaningful ways. We also gained insights into effective practices for engagement from the perspectives of patients and providers as they worked together to create winning conditions for engagement and improvement. These insights have been summarized into practical engagement tipsheets (refer to Boxes 1 and 2).

BOX 1. 10 insights from healthcare providers and leaders

  1. Recognize the value of patient engagement.
  2. Consider patients as members of the improvement team.
  3. Work together to co-design improvements.
  4. Engage patients early and involve them throughout the project.
  5. Support and role model engagement.
  6. Understand the experience of care through the eyes of patients.
  7. Provide patients with ongoing support.
  8. Provide staff and physicians with ongoing support.
  9. Ensure your team has the proper resources to engage patients.
  10. Evaluate your engagement efforts.

Source: CFHI 2018a.

 

BOX 2.10 lessons learned from patient and family advisors

  1. Clarify my role.
  2. Educate others on my role and the value I bring.
  3. Equip me with the information I need to be successful.
  4. Involve me from the beginning.
  5. Including one patient advisor is good; including more is better.
  6. Sustain my involvement throughout the process.
  7. Make engagement activities accessible and provide options for how I can get involved.
  8. Promote networking opportunities.
  9. Continue working with us after the project has finished.
  10. We can do much more than just tell our stories.
Source: CFHI 2018b.

 

Conceptualizing “Engagement-Capable Environments”

Meaningful engagement of patients and families constitutes a culture change in how teams function and how care is organized and delivered within organizations. From research work that explored the initial PEPs, the concept of “engagement-capable environments” (Baker and Denis 2011; Baker et al. 2016a) emerged. The concept was further refined through other CFHI-supported work (Baker et al. 2016b; Judd et al. 2015). The term “engagement-capable environments” refers to those organizations that have enabled meaningful engagement through the enactment of three main pillars: (1) enlisting and preparing patients and families; (2) training and preparing staff for engagement; and (3) ensuring leadership support of engagement activities by providing resources and infrastructure to enable these activities to unfold (Figure 2). Through CFHI collaboratives, we have observed the varying degrees and multiple methods by which teams have enacted these three pillars to create engagement-capable environments, with resulting variation in experiences and outcomes. Although the individual pillars form the foundation to engage, the synergy from the combined impact of these pillars helps bring about the culture change required to support engagement efforts. The concept of engagement-capable environments taps into the many complex components of organizational readiness for change: leaders who are able to articulate, support and demonstrate the commitment and value of engaging with patients and families and the collective preparation and abilities of providers and patients to work together (Weiner 2009). A recent casebook explores the concept of engagement-capable environments and describes how these pillars have been enacted in different ways by high-performing engagement organizations in North America and the UK (Baker et al. 2016b). Below we offer reflections on the lessons learned through our collaboratives in the context of the evolution of our thinking on engagement-capable environments in Canada and how CFHI has enacted these lessons on our journey to becoming an organization that is engagement capable. 

FIGURE 2. Model of engagement-capable environments

Figure 2

Source: Baker and Denis 2011.

Enlisting and preparing patients and families: from “advisor” to “partner” and beyond

Over the last eight years, CFHI has supported organizations in the recruitment and development of patients as advisors on organizational priorities and initiatives. As a result, many teams in CFHI collaboratives, particularly in the initial PEP 

initiatives, sought to develop infrastructures to support their engagement practices, for example, the development of patient orientation manuals and toolkits, strategies for recruitment and training for patients and families to work as advisors on organizational committees. Increasingly, CFHI has encouraged more collaborative (rather than consultative) models of engagement, to develop the role of patients as partners and to support co-design activities and involvement of patients much earlier in the process to determine organizational priorities based on patients’ needs and experiences.

The development of roles of advisors or partners represents an important strategy to support patient engagement initiatives that is both symbolic (i.e., the importance of including the patient voice and their visible presence as a reminder of their centrality in healthcare) and functional (i.e., the ability to co-design initiatives with the inclusion of patients as key actors in the process). However, a real danger exists if the engagement is not authentic and the inclusion of patients as advisors or partners is a token gesture to indicate that they are included but not considered. Legislative or policy requirements to include patients as part of the process may encourage tokenistic efforts if organizations are not fully prepared to engage. Although CFHI has requested the inclusion of advisors and encouraged their involvement more fully as patient partners on quality improvement teams, we have gained a fuller appreciation that there is a “mosaic” of engagement activities (Tritter and McCallum 2006) and sought to augment the role of advisors/partners by encouraging other engagement opportunities that seek out patients’ experiences more broadly across the organization on a wider set of issues and possible solutions. For example, as part of a project with a CFHI collaborative, Bruyère Hospital in Ottawa invited patient and family advisors (PFAs) to work with them to develop a “passport to home” as part of their care transitions improvement initiative (CFHI 2016). The hospital employed multiple methods of engagement beyond the inclusion of PFAs on the improvement team. Bruyère measured and gathered patients’ experiences at different points in the transition and regularly interviewed patients currently receiving care – all of which broadened the understanding of patients’ experiences of care transitions – while concurrently working together with PFAs to develop new processes and resources to support patients and families in their transition to home. Bruyère’s work with patient advisors as team members led to co-designed solutions; the other strategies for engagement brought more diverse voices into their work. Using a range of methods not only reduces a hierarchy of engagement methods that assumes one is better than others but also recognizes that different engagement methods are required for different purposes (Tritter and McCallum 2006). Clear articulation of the purpose of engagement (i.e., why patients are being engaged) is fundamental to clarifying expectations for engagement and influence on decision-making processes.

Employing numerous engagement methods (from consultative methods, such as focus groups or surveys, to more collaborative methods, such as patient partners on improvement teams) also alleviates the expectation that a few, selected patients can represent the voices of all patients. Greenhalgh and colleagues described these tensions of “representation” versus “representativeness”; the ability to include many voices through different engagement methods allows for a more robust understanding of patients’ experiences to guide improvement efforts (Greenhalgh et al. 2011a). Tensions are also raised regarding “naïve” versus “professionalized” patients who have gained enough knowledge and insight on the inner workings of the healthcare system and thus are considered no longer able to bring a fresh or naïve perspective (Greenhalgh et al. 2011a; Hogg and Williamson 2001; Martin 2008). Paradoxically, it would appear that patients are the one group where limited experience is seen as an asset. However, this represents a conundrum for patients who have equipped themselves by gaining knowledge of the system in their desire to actively contribute to improvements but, by doing so, are seen to have too much “insider” knowledge (Barnes and Cotterell 2012). A spectrum of strategies for engagement helps ensure that a range of patients’ experiences are captured and considered throughout the improvement process, with less reliance on one or a few. Through our collaboratives at CFHI, we have noted that partnering experienced patient advisors with individuals who are new to advising is a powerful combination, to support new advisors in their role and to gain the skills of effective engagement. It often takes time for patients to feel comfortable in sharing their perspective, but their current or recent lived experiences are tremendously valuable, as is having advisors who have experience with advising and know what meaningful engagement looks like. Peer-to-peer support in patient engagement has been cultivated by patients and families through both informal and formal channels.

Growing experiences in the learning collaboratives has also led us to broaden our methods of engagement beyond advisors and partners on our committees. In our most recent programming, we employed a range of engagement methods across the continuum, from one-on-one interviews to involvement on working groups with CFHI staff, to ensure that we considered a range of patient perspectives. Similarly, when developing policies internally (e.g., for patient scholarships, patient compensation), we have employed methods such as Twitter chats and surveys as forms of consultation to learn more from patients what would work best for them while at the same time engaging with patient partners on working groups to co-design processes and policies.

Engaging staff to involve patients: recognizing power and identity

A key learning from our initial foray into patient engagement was the importance of preparing staff to engage with patients in their improvement efforts and the need for honest self-assessment on the current state of engagement efforts within teams and organizations. Many teams rated themselves higher on their current level of engagement with staff, assuming that they were already “doing it.” However, teams often realized that they had underestimated the need to support staff to learn how to engage and include the perspectives of patients in meaningful ways in their initiatives. Understanding why the involvement of patients is essential for patient-centred practices is foundational for staff in recognizing the value of patients’ perspectives to improve the processes and delivery of care. Organizations that expend the time, resources and energy, learn how to engage in meaningful ways also become more mature in their efforts to engage, deepening relationships with patients and families (McIntosh-Murray et al. 2013). Teams in organizations such as Huron Perth Healthcare Alliance (CFHI 2014) dedicated significant time and effort to support staff members and teams to authentically engage with patients, facilitating efforts to actively include patients’ perspectives in meetings, to develop solutions and to set clear expectations for how teams would work together. Patient advisors also co-developed and co-led education sessions for staff on engagement and on their quality improvement initiatives.

Another team, from McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), supported efforts for patients, providers and leaders to learn together. In their “Transforming Care at the Bedside” initiative (CFHI 2012), teams learned and developed quality improvement skills together during their training. Learning together in this way helped to negate a view of “‘us versus them” in their improvement efforts. Patients and staff learned new improvement skills together, blurring the boundaries of their defined roles (i.e., that of the health professional and the patient) and reducing the potential to adopt dominant or subordinate roles (Fine 1994). Instead, learning together represented a form of “inclusionary Othering”, by recognizing the unique skills and experiences of each member and developing relationships through learning for coalition building (Canales 2000). As noted by a senior healthcare administrator leading a team within a CFHI collaborative:

It’s hard to talk about, so I kind of understand why the silence is a bit deafening – and it is the whole issue around power and expertise, and what’s taken for granted and who gets to say what when and who gets to decide what matters, what the topics of conversation are. I think all the good intentions around patient engagement, the actual changes to environments, our culture, will not succeed because it doesn’t really address some of these issues related to power, and that is closely tied to identity. You know there is an identity about being a clinician that has to do with expertise and competence and so on and an identity that has to do with being a patient that puts both parties into specific roles and it’s actually really hard to break that and you can never know in advance whether it’s good to break it or not. So I think sometimes there’s an optimism or a belief in emancipation in the patient engagement movement that would say that patient engagement is good and that non-engagement is bad, but I think it’s so much more contextually bound and complex than that and issues around power and identity are really central to teasing all that apart.

Thus, the ability to build relationships and learn together, respecting and valuing the expertise and experience that each brings to the team, begins to break down the current hierarchies that exist locally within teams and more broadly within the system.

As our experience of what is required for meaningful engagement has developed, we have made deliberate efforts at CFHI to ensure that staff have a foundational understanding that recognizes the value that patients and families bring to our improvement efforts and programming. We have hired a patient partner onto our team as a form of inclusionary Othering – in essence, a patient leader who leads capacity-building efforts, coaches staff within the organization and engages with staff to build strong and consistent engagement practices.

Ensuring leadership support and strategic focus: Advancing the model of engagement-capable environments

Teams participating in CFHI collaboratives stressed the importance of leadership support for engagement at multiple levels of the organization, with senior leaders “setting the tone” and providing a strategic focus at an organizational level, but also local leaders in each initiative who supported efforts to involve patients in activities and decisions. This distributive form of leadership for patient engagement ensures that resources, structures and a common commitment were present at all levels of the organization, not simply from the top down. Distributive leadership models have been linked to improvements in services and patient outcomes, with strong relationships among leaders and with their teams as a key factor to enable change (Fitzgerald et al. 2013). 

Successful patient engagement is fundamentally a culture change within an organization, incorporating an underlying philosophy of care that values and respects patients’ perspectives and needs. Patient engagement is also about relationships – building, maintaining and sustaining relationships and making those human connections, a feature that requires more exploration to be further articulated within the model of engagement-capable environments. The interactions, trust and respect that are developed in these relationships between patients, staff and leaders create the glue for engagement-capable environments. These relationships provide a shared understanding of the purpose, roles, responsibilities and expectations for engagement, helping to shift power relationships and fostering more collaborative and distributive leadership models (Fitzgerald et al. 2013) that will challenge the status quo, remove barriers and create new structures that support teams, including patients, to work in new and different ways. These relationship practices will move us to “relational engagement and relational accountability that can lead to partnered changes and improvements across health care” (Plamondon and Caxaj 2018). The notion of relational engagement and, importantly, human connection is well articulated by Anya Humphrey, a patient advisor who has been involved with the work of CFHI since the first PEP initiative and, subsequently, in the development and evaluation of CFHI programs (Box 3).

BOX 3. An excerpt from Anya Humphrey, patient advisor with CFHI, from a presentation made at the IPFCC conference in Baltimore, Maryland, June 2018

I lost both my husband and son to cancer, and although they both received excellent treatment, their deaths did not go well. So I’ve been a patient/family advisor for over seven years now, because like many – if not all – PFAs, I wanted to prevent others from having the kind of experience my family had.

In every place where I have volunteered, it has been the first time an organization chose to involve someone like me. I have been privileged, but also challenged at times, by the circumstances I have faced when patient and family engagement was a new phenomenon in Canada.

I have worked as a PFA on initiatives with several organizations and in addition to the three pillars of engagement-capable environments that you have heard about – all of which were more or less missing in my less successful opportunities – I would add another crucial ingredient for success: the importance of establishing interpersonal connections. Nothing replaces the feeling of knowing and being known to other people. You might think that this would be impossible when serving on provincial or national committees whose work mostly takes place on the telephone, and when as PFAs we are never in the building with our colleagues so we don’t hear about day-to-day matters. But in my experience, the opposite is true. It has become standard practice for such groups to have at least an introductory face-to-face meeting in order for participants to get to know one another a bit. And since we all have to travel long distances for that, we stay in hotels and need to eat at restaurants. So frequently there will be a group dinner as well as lunches and coffee times when we can either talk about the issues at hand in a more informal way, or even avoid them altogether. These opportunities are priceless to me. They make me feel that I am part of a team, that I have a connection with the other people, that I know who they are when I hear their voices on the phone. And since I often tell parts of my story at such big events, there is usually someone there that I know, who might even give me a comforting hug when I break down – something that happened to me not long ago, which makes me cry to remember. I don’t think I can express to you how helpful and meaningful it was for me to have someone in healthcare respond to my distress by putting her arms around me. In my opinion the work that comes out of these events goes deeper and is more satisfying than anything that has happened locally. When committee members live and work near to one another, the dinners and coffees just don’t happen unless the leadership makes that a priority.

A fellow PFA used a quote at a national meeting that strikes me as nailing this. I was so impressed by it that I looked up its original context. Thomas Merton, the theologian and activist, once received a letter from a young man who was working hard in the world peace movement and had become thoroughly disenchanted. Merton wrote back an encouraging letter in which he said, “In the end, it is the reality of personal relationships that saves everything.”

It seems clear then that an organization that is led by someone who deals respectfully and compassionately with their staff is modelling a type of relationship that can spread throughout that institution and beyond that to the people they deal with. When this style is in place, the tone of interactions actually helps inform and guide the direction they take. The roles I have had with such organizations have grown and changed over time as all of us feel our way together about what is possible. The creative potential that exists in the context of relationship fosters interesting conversations, new ideas emerge, and there is a kind of excitement about trying new things. In many ways, none of us really could have any preparation for that, since we are essentially entering new territory, but in an environment where people take precedence over data, this collegial approach filters down through everything they do. And because they model that, it affects all the projects they recruit and support. To my mind, engagement-capable environments are those that have a heart.

CFHI = Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement; IPFCC = Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care; PFA = patient and family advisor.

 

What Next for the Field of Patient Engagement?

The meaningful involvement of patients in improvement and system redesign has been a learning journey for CFHI and for healthcare organizations across Canada – each at different points along the trajectory. As expectations to involve patients – in care, in healthcare improvement and across the health system – continue to grow, CFHI will remain steadfast in its support to propel organizations as they further develop and fine-tune their engagement efforts. Creating, maintaining and sustaining relationships between those who deliver and organize care and those who receive care is a central feature of engagement efforts. These new relationships represent a shift in the power required to authentically partner, which, in turn, will result in the culture change required for meaningful engagement. CFHI has advocated for partnership models of engagement that enable co-design efforts, yet also recognizes that a full mosaic of methods to involve and engage patients is needed. The broader range of methods allows us to be more inclusive of many voices and experiences that will influence our thinking and understanding of patients’ experiences and their journey through the healthcare system. As organizations become increasingly savvy in their ability to engage, CFHI will have a role to play in bringing these like-minded organizations together as networks, to exert increasing influence across the entire patient journey and continuum of care. Leading initiatives, such as the Collaborative Chronic Care Network based out of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital (Farmanova et al. 2016), demonstrate that partnerships of organizations, researchers, clinicians and patients nation-wide that are strengthened with technology – the sharing of data, information, priorities and experiences – can result in changes in care practices and models of care that translate into improved patient outcomes.

Patient engagement is a local strategy within organizations but feeds into a larger social movement across the entire system (Bate et al. 2004; Bibby et al. 2009) as patients and families become increasingly vocal regarding their experiences and needs for care. Mobile communications and learning technologies are a key enabler of patients and families taking more control of their care through improved understanding and knowledge, and connections through social media channels will also foster engagement efforts on a broader scale, linking patients across silos and amplifying their voices. CFHI has directed its efforts primarily in the engagement of patients, but public engagement strategies, particularly as they relate to priority setting and policy development, will become more apparent in our work.

There is a need to support more research into the practice of patient engagement, to enhance the evidence base required to demonstrate its value beyond engagement as “the right thing to do.” More work is required to explicate the linkages between engagement processes and structures and the outcomes of engagement activities. We need to understand what works and why and with what impact. Although the field of patient engagement continues to grow at a rapid pace, the work of researchers in the field can shed further light on what makes for meaningful engagement practices and links to improved outcomes and experiences for patients.

At CFHI, we are “learning by doing” and recognize our own journey of walking the talk of engagement and being consistent in our practices as we build an organization that is an engagement-capable environment. Learning from these experiences will enable us to make further changes together with patient partners to enhance patients’ experiences and outcomes, transforming the system into one that is truly focused on and responds to the needs and expectations of patients and families. 

Notes 

  1. The saying “nothing about us, without us” has its origins in Central European political traditions (Latin: Nihil de nobis, sine nobis). The English form was used by disability activists in the 1990s and is the title of a book on disability rights by James Charlton. The saying has been adopted by many other interest groups and social movements, including, more recently, by patients and users of the health system.
  2. Throughout this paper, the authors use the term “patient” as an overarching term inclusive of individuals with lived experience of the healthcare system that also includes the term resident, client, or service user. When referring to patient engagement this may also include patients’ families and caregivers.

 

Soutenir l’engagement du patient et de sa famille à l’amélioration des soins de santé : réflexions sur les « environnements propices à l’engagement » dans le cadre de projets collaboratifs d’apprentissage pancanadiens  

Carol Fancott, G. Ross Baker, Maria Judd, Anya Humphrey and Angela Morin

Résumé 

Bien que l’engagement du patient à ses soins personnels joue un rôle essentiel dans la notion des soins centrés sur le patient, au cours des 10 dernières années, son engagement dans les domaines de la formation des professionnels de la santé, de l’élaboration des politiques, de la gouvernance, de la recherche et de l’amélioration des soins de santé a connu une évolution rapide au Canada. La Fondation canadienne pour l’amélioration des services de santé (FCASS) a aidé des organismes de soins de santé du Canada à encourager un engagement véritable du patient aux efforts d’amélioration de la qualité et de refonte du système. Cet article décrit des initiatives de la FCASS visant à renforcer les efforts d’engagement du patient au Canada, ainsi que les enseignements retenus dans le contexte des « environnements propices à l’engagement ». En terminant, il propose des réflexions sur l’avenir de l’engagement du patient au Canada. 

Introduction 

Les systèmes de santé du monde entier réagissent à la revendication « rien sur moi sans moi »1 tandis qu’ils tentent de mettre en pratique des soins centrés sur le patient et sa famille en encourageant l’engagement plus active du patient à ses soins. Plus généralement, dans les domaines de l’éducation, de la recherche, de l’élaboration des politiques et de l’amélioration de la qualité, les efforts d’engagement du patient continuent de se développer. Par exemple, la Stratégie de recherche axée sur le patient, financée par les Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada (CIHR 2018), a établi de nouvelles attentes quant à la collaboration des chercheurs avec les usagers du système de santé, entre autres pour définir les priorités en matière de recherche, mais également en vue de solliciter l’engagement active du patient2 et du public à l’ensemble de l’entreprise de la recherche, en tant que partenaires du processus, plutôt que comme de simples participants aux études. Dans les professions de la santé, les efforts en matière de formation tels que ceux de la Faculté de médecine de l’Université de Montréal (Karazivan et al. 2015) ont ouvert la voie à l’intégration du patient en tant que partenaire dans la formation de la prochaine génération de médecins et de professionnels de la santé. Il s’agit de produire des soins collaboratifs et compatissants dans la pratique professionnelle. Les organismes de soins de santé du monde entier se sont efforcés de tirer parti de l’expertise et de la sagesse des patients et de leurs proches pour exploiter leur expérience afin d’améliorer la sécurité et la qualité des soins. En tant que domaine de qualité, les soins centrés sur le patient sont l’objet de mesures incitatives dans divers systèmes de par le monde et se déclinent en nombreux leviers (p. ex. exigences législatives, normes d’agrément). Les organismes de prestation reconnaissent de plus en plus que l’amélioration de l’expérience et des résultats de soins du patient exige l’engagement active du patient à la conception et à la mise en oeuvre de ces améliorations. 

PRINCIPAUX MESSAGES

  1. Les projets collaboratifs d’apprentissage sur l’engagement du patient et de sa famille ont aidé des organismes de soins de santé de partout au Canada dans leurs efforts de création d’environnements propices à l’engagement et de collaboration véritable avec le patient au service de l’amélioration.
  2. Les efforts d’engagement du patient ont évolué au cours de la dernière décennie dans tous les domaines de soins de santé, mais une évaluation plus poussée s’impose pour mieux comprendre les mécanismes sur lesquels s’appuient les initiatives réussies, ainsi que les raisons qui expliquent leur succès et leurs effets. 
  3. Les liens et rapports humains sont indispensables aux efforts d’engagement du patient.

 

Au Canada, la Fondation canadienne pour l’amélioration des services de santé (FCASS), un organisme sans but lucratif financé par le gouvernement fédéral qui s’attache à l’accélération de l’amélioration des soins de santé et à la transformation des systèmes, estime que l’engagement du patient et du citoyen est l’un des six leviers les plus importants de l’amélioration, comme l’indique son cadre (Figure 1). L’engagement du patient, de ses proches et des collectivités, en tant que moteur de changement et d’amélioration du système de santé, est un objectif stratégique et constitue la charpente des activités et programmes de la Fondation. Cet article décrit brièvement l’approche adoptée par la FCASS depuis 2010 pour aider les organismes de soins de santé du Canada à collaborer de manière authentique avec les patients et leurs proches en vue d’améliorer la qualité des soins et de refondre les systèmes à l’aide de quatre initiatives d’apprentissage pancanadiennes. Le concept « d’environnements propices à l’engagement » (Baker et Denis 2011; Baker et al. 2016a) est issu d’une recherche menée dans le cadre des premiers projets collaboratifs sur l’engagement et d’autres travaux soutenus par la FCASS auprès d’organismes qui ont produit des expériences et des résultats d’engagement tangibles. Cet article examine également l’évolution du domaine de l’engagement du patient et la croissance de la FCASS en tant qu’organisme visant à devenir un environnement propice à l’engagement. Cet article se conclut sur des réflexions par rapport à l’avenir de l’engagement du patient et sur ce que la FCASS peut contribuer en tant qu’entité nationale pour accélérer les améliorations en matière de soins de santé avec l’engagement active du patient et de sa famille.

TABLEAU 1. Résumé de quatre initiatives d’apprentissage / projets collaboratifs de la FCASS en matière d’engagement du patient et de sa famille

Projet

Projets d’engagement du patient (PEP) I

Projets d’engagement du patient (PEP) II

Agir en partenariat avec les patients et leurs familles au service de l’AQ 

Meilleurs ensemble (partie d’une campagne plus vaste)

Objectif

Promouvoir et soutenir l’engagement du patient à la conception, à la prestation et à l'évaluation des services de santé pour aboutir à des soins de grande qualité centrés sur le patient

Promouvoir et soutenir des projets d'intervention qui suscite l’engagement du patient à la conception, à la prestation et à l'évaluation de services de santé pour aboutir à des soins de grande qualité centrés sur le patient

Renforcer la capacité d'améliorer la culture organisationnelle afin de créer des partenariats avec les patients et leurs familles pour améliorer la qualité tout au long du continuum de soins de santé

Développer la capacité organisationnelle en matière d’appréciation, de planification, de mise en oeuvre, d’évaluation et de pérennisation de la présence des familles et introduire des pratiques qui soutiennent les soins centrés sur le patient et sa famille dans les hôpitaux afin d'améliorer l'expérience et la satisfaction du patient et du personnel

Durée

24 mois

24 mois

17 mois

11 mois

Fonds de démarrage

Jusqu’à 100 000 $

Jusqu’à 100 000 $

Jusqu’à 50 000 $

Aucun financement de démarrage

Équipes admises

10 équipes (4 provinces)

7 équipes (5 provinces)

22 équipes (6 provinces, 1 territoire)

12 équipes (7 provinces)

Approche d’évaluation

Recherche qualitative (entretiens, révision de document[s])

Recherche qualitative (entretiens, révision de document[s])

Sondages d’équipe, analyse de réseaux sociaux, révision de document(s), échelle d'évaluation collaborative, entretiens 

Sondages, révision de document(s), échelle d'évaluation collaborative, entretiens

 AQ = amélioration de la qualité; FCASS = Fondation canadienne pour l’amélioration des services de santé.

Approche de la FCASS en matière d’engagement et de programmes

 La FCASS a adapté et adopté une définition de Tambuyzer et de ses collègues pour apporter plus de clarté à son travail en matière d’engagement : « L’engagement du patient est la contribution du patient ou de ses proches à la prise de décisions et sa contribution active à diverses activités (p.ex. planification, évaluation, soins, recherche, formation et recrutement). Partant du principe que l’on acquiert un savoir au fil de l’expérience, l’engagement du patient signifie une collaboration et un partenariat avec les professionnels » (Tambuyzer et al. 2014). Le continuum d’engagement du public proposé par l’Association internationale pour l’engagement publique (2015) (à savoir, informer, consulter, inclure, collaborer et responsabiliser) précise dans quelle mesure le continuum d’engagement est lié à l’influence du public (ou du patient) sur la prise de décisions. Le cadre d’engagement proposé par Carman et ses collègues fournit des informations supplémentaires en proposant également un continuum d’engagement (consulter, impliquer ou partager le leadership), ainsi que des considérations relatives eux efforts de mobilisation déployés aux niveaux des soins directs, des programmes de l’organisme et de l’élaboration des politiques (Carman et al. 2013). Les efforts de la FCASS sont principalement axés sur l’engagement du patient aux niveaux méso et macro, c’est-à-dire encourager l’engagement du patient aux efforts d’amélioration aux niveaux des programmes ou de l’organisme et dans le cadre de politiques soutenant les pratiques centrées sur le patient. Leur objectif ultime est d’améliorer l’expérience et les résultats du patient en matière de soins.

&Au Canada, la Fondation canadienne pour l’amélioration des services de santé (FCASS), un organisme sans but lucratif financé par le gouvernement fédéral qui s’attache à l’accélération de l’amélioration des soins de santé et à la transformation des systèmes, estime que l’engagement du patient et du citoyen est l’un des six leviers les plus importants de l’amélioration, comme l’indique son cadre (Figure 1). L’engagement du patient, de ses proches et des collectivités, en tant que moteur de changement et d’amélioration du système de santé, est un objectif stratégique et constitue la charpente des activités et programmes de la Fondation. Cet article décrit brièvement l’approche adoptée par la FCASS depuis 2010 pour aider les organismes de soins de santé du Canada à collaborer de manière authentique avec les patients et leurs proches en vue d’améliorer la qualité des soins et de refondre les systèmes à l’aide de quatre initiatives d’apprentissage pancanadiennes. Le concept « d’environnements propices à l’engagement » (Baker et Denis 2011; Baker et al. 2016a) est issu d’une recherche menée dans le cadre des premiers projets collaboratifs sur l’engagement et d’autres travaux soutenus par la FCASS auprès d’organismes qui ont produit des expériences et des résultats d’engagement tangibles. Cet article examine également l’évolution du domaine de l’engagement du patient et la croissance de la FCASS en tant qu’organisme visant à devenir un environnement propice à l’engagement. Cet article se conclut sur des réflexions par rapport à l’avenir de l’engagement du patient et sur ce que la FCASS peut contribuer en tant qu’entité nationale pour accélérer les améliorations en matière de soins de santé avec l’engagement active du patient et de sa famille. Approche de la FCASS en matière d’engagement et de programmes La FCASS a adapté et adopté une définition de Tambuyzer et de ses collègues pour apporter plus de clarté à son travail en matière d’engagement : « L’engagement du patient est la contribution du patient ou de ses proches à la prise de décisions et sa contribution active à diverses activités (p.ex. planification, évaluation, soins, recherche, formation et recrutement). Partant du principe que l’on acquiert un savoir au fil de l’expérience, l’engagement du patient signifie une collaboration et un partenariat avec les professionnels » (Tambuyzer et al. 2014). Le continuum d’engagement du public proposé par l’Association internationale pour l’engagement publique (2015) (à savoir, informer, consulter, inclure, collaborer et responsabiliser) précise dans quelle mesure le continuum d’engagement est lié à l’influence du public (ou du patient) sur la prise de décisions. Le cadre d’engagement proposé par Carman et ses collègues fournit des informations supplémentaires en proposant également un continuum d’engagement (consulter, impliquer ou partager le leadership), ainsi que des considérations relatives eux efforts de mobilisation déployés aux niveaux des soins directs, des programmes de l’organisme et de l’élaboration des politiques (Carman et al. 2013). Les efforts de la FCASS sont principalement axés sur l’engagement du patient aux niveaux méso et macro, c’est-à-dire encourager l’engagement du patient aux efforts d’amélioration aux niveaux des programmes ou de l’organisme et dans le cadre de politiques soutenant les pratiques centrées sur le patient. Leur objectif ultime est d’améliorer l’expérience et les résultats du patient en matière de soins.;

FIGURE 1. Les six leviers (ou catalyseurs) de la FCASS pour accélérer l’amélioration des services de santé

Figure 1

FCASS = Fondation canadienne pour l’amélioration des services de santé.

Les quatre initiatives d’apprentissage et projets collaboratifs de la FCASS ont réuni 51 équipes réparties dans huit provinces et un territoire du Canada. L’objectif global de ces travaux était de renforcer la capacité organisationnelle en matière  d’engagement du patient et de sa famille (voir le Tableau 1 pour des détails sur chacun des quatre groupes d’apprentissage). Lorsque la FCASS a lancé sa première initiative de « projets sur l’engagement du patient » (PEP) en 2010, la notion des soins centrés sur le patient était déjà fermement ancrée dans les dimensions essentielles de la qualité (Institute of Medicine 2001). En outre, des conseils ou comités constitués de patients ou d’usagers étaient déjà bien intégrés à certains domaines de soins (en pédiatrie par exemple) et dans certaines instances (au Québec par exemple). Cependant, le concept d’un patient plus engagé et plus intégré, en particulier au niveau organisationnel, n’en était qu’à ses balbutiements au Canada. Conséquemment, bon nombre d’équipes des premiers groupes subventionnés par la FCASS se sont concentrées sur la mise en place de l’infrastructure nécessaire à l’intensification des efforts de mobilisation. Ensemble, de concert avec la FCASS, ces équipes ont appris à agir en véritable partenariat avec leurs patients, en les faisant participer plus délibérément à l’ensemble des efforts d’amélioration. Dans des projets collaboratifs subséquents, la FCASS a encouragé l’intégration de pratiques plus avancées dans le continuum de l’engagement du patient, afin de permettre à davantage de modèles collaboratifs de se développer entre patients et prestataires des équipes d’amélioration. Les équipes de ces initiatives d’apprentissage initiales couvraient tous les secteurs de la santé (soins primaires, soins à domicile, soins de courte durée et soins de suivi) et les populations d’intérêt (soins pédiatriques, soins oncologiques, orthopédie, maladies chroniques), ainsi qu’un vaste éventail d’initiatives d’amélioration (p. ex. transitions de soins, processus d’admission et de congé, développement de ressources en soins primaires pour l’engagement du patient). Dans notre dernier projet collaboratif sur l’engagement, nous nous sommes concentrés plus délibérément sur la mise en oeuvre d’une initiative de politiques précisément liées à la présence des proches dans les milieux de soins, en veillant à intégrer l’engagement du patient et de sa famille à son développement, à sa mise en oeuvre et à son évaluation.

Le modèle de ces projets collaboratifs d’apprentissage a évolué au fil de ces quatre groupes d’équipes. Au final, il comprenait des possibilités d’apprentissage régulières en personne et virtuelles, au moyen de webinaires, un apprentissage entre pairs, un accompagnement assuré par des formateurs, des possibilités de réseautage et un financement de démarrage. Dans son tout dernier projet collaboratif virtuel, la cyber-collaboration « Meilleurs ensemble », la FCASS a mis à l’essai un modèle d’apprentissage virtuel et offert des possibilités d’encadrement, d’enseignement et de réseautage aux équipes afin de faire avancer leurs initiatives stratégiques auprès des patients et de leurs proches. D’importants progrès ont été réalisés par des projets collaboratifs récents qui ont fait appel à des patients ressources en tant que formateurs ou enseignants. Ceux-ci avaient pour but de fournir un soutien accru aux équipes dans leurs efforts de mobilisation et de les encourager à réfléchir à l’objectif, au rôle et aux attentes par rapport à leur collaboration avec le patient.

Les méthodes et l’objet de l’évaluation des programmes d’engagement du patient de la FCASS ont également évolué au fil du temps, grâce à une meilleure compréhension des processus et résultats de l’engagement. La FCASS a utilisé et mis à l’essai de nombreuses approches pour mieux comprendre lesquelles sont fructueuses, pour quelles raisons, avec quels processus de mobilisation et avec quels résultats. Tandis que le domaine de l’engagement commençait à s’imposer au moment des deux premières initiatives de PEP, on a choisi une approche qualitative en matière d’évaluation pour approfondir la compréhension des méthodes d’engagement utilisées par les équipes, les processus employés pour intégrer la voix du patient et le contexte organisationnel qui a facilité ou entravé les efforts de mobilisation. Cette étude qualitative a permis de mieux comprendre comment les équipes percevaient l’engagement du patient. Cette recherche a également souligné l’importance d’un contexte organisationnel favorable à l’engagement véritable du patient. Les équipes provenant d’organisations qui profitaient d’un appui solide et visible de la haute direction étaient en mesure d’élaborer et de pérenniser une philosophie de soins centrés sur le patient, établissant par le fait même un contexte plus mûr dans lequel elles étaient capables d’employer des stratégies de mobilisation plus évoluées qui se rapprochaient de la « conception conjointe » dans le continuum de l’engagement (McIntosh-Murray et al. 2013). Dans ces organismes, les patients travaillaient en partenariat avec les prestataires pour apprendre des méthodes d’amélioration de la qualité, évaluer les possibilités d’amélioration et concevoir ensemble des solutions. Ainsi, ils amélioraient à la fois l’expérience du patient en matière de soins et l’expérience du prestataire en matière de prestation de soins, ainsi que d’autres résultats liés à la qualité.

S’appuyant sur les résultats de ces recherches, les projets collaboratifs subséquents en matière d’engagement du patient et de sa famille ont porté plus particulièrement sur l’intégration de patients ressources aux équipes d’amélioration de la qualité afin de travailler avec les prestataires et les dirigeants à l’élaboration et à la mise en oeuvre d’initiatives d’amélioration. Les efforts d’évaluation consistaient à mieux comprendre l’influence de l’intégration du patient ressource sur le fonctionnement de l’équipe à l’aide de méthodes telles que l’analyse des réseaux sociaux (Valente 2010) et l’évaluation de l’expérience et de l’efficacité de l’équipe (Orchard et al. 2012; Shortell et al. 2004). Ces approches ont examiné les points de vue de tous les membres de l’équipe, notamment ceux des patients ressources, afin de mieux comprendre le fonctionnement de l’équipe avec des patients ressources en tant que membres de l’équipe. Edmondson et al. (2001) ont observé que les équipes suivent un processus d’apprentissage lors de l’établissement de nouvelles routines. Les équipes qui réussissent portent une attention particulière à la sélection et à la préparation des membres, créent une sécurité psychologique favorable à l’expérience de nouvelles pratiques, mettent à l’essai de nouvelles routines et réfléchissent à leurs expériences. Le contexte organisationnel était étudié à l’aide d’entrevues et de groupes de discussion composés de patients, de proches et de membres de l’équipe afin de fournir une compréhension plus nuancée des rôles et du contexte organisationnel des travaux. L’évaluation a également pris en compte les résultats de l’équipe de projet, ainsi que la capacité et les connaissances acquises dans les domaines de l’amélioration de la qualité, de la gestion du changement et des pratiques d’engagement. Cette approche d’évaluation à méthodes mixtes a ainsi produit une caractérisation multidimensionnelle des pratiques d’engagement et organisationnelles nécessaires au travail de partenariat véritable entre professionnels et patients. Elle a également permis d’acquérir des connaissances sur les pratiques efficaces en matière d’engagement, tant du point de vue du patient que du prestataire, lorsqu’ils travaillaient ensemble à l’établissement des conditions propices à l’engagement et à l’amélioration. Ces informations ont été résumées dans des fiches de conseils pratiques sur l’engagement (voir les encadrés 1 et 2).

ENCADRÉ 1.10 réflexions provenant de dirigeants et de prestataires de soins de santé

  1. Reconnaissez la valeur de l’engagement du patient.

  2. Voyez les patients comme des membres de l’équipe d’amélioration.

  3. Travaillez ensemble pour concevoir conjointement les améliorations.

  4. Faites participer les patients à un stade précoce et veillez à les faire participer tout au long du projet.

  5. Soutenez l’engagement et soyez un modèle pour les autres.

  6. Envisagez l’expérience de soins au travers des yeux du patient.

  7. Accordez un soutien continu aux patients.

  8. Accordez un soutien continu au personnel et aux médecins.

  9. Veillez à ce que votre équipe dispose de ressources suffisantes pour mobiliser les patients.

  10. Évaluez vos efforts de mobilisation.

Source : CFHI 2018a.

 

ENCADRÉ 2.10 enseignements retenus de patients et de proches ressources

  1. Précisez mon rôle.

  2. Renseignez les autres au sujet de mon rôle et de la valeur que je contribue.

  3. Donnez-moi l’information dont j’ai besoin pour réussir.

  4. Faites-moi participer d’entrée de jeu.

  5. Un patient ressource, c’est bien; plus d’un, c’est mieux.

  6. Maintenez ma participation tout au long du processus.

  7. Rendez les activités d’engagement accessibles et proposez-moi des modalités d’engagement.

  8. Encouragez les possibilités de réseautage.

  9. Continuez de travailler avec moi après la fin du projet.

  10. Je peux faire bien plus que raconter mon récit.

Source : CFHI 2018b.

Conceptualisation « d’environnements propices à l’engagement »

L’engagement véritable du patient et de sa famille constitue un changement de culture dans le fonctionnement des équipes et dans l’organisation et la prestation des soins au sein des organismes de santé. Les travaux de recherche qui ont exploré les PEP initiaux ont fait émerger le concept « d’environnements propices à l’engagement » (Baker et Denis 2011; Baker et al. 2016a). Le concept a ensuite été affiné dans le cadre de travaux supplémentaires menés par la FCASS (Baker et al. 2016b; Judd et al. 2015). L’expression « environnements propices à l’engagement » désigne des organismes qui ont encouragé un engagement authentique grâce à la mise en oeuvre de trois piliers principaux : (1) la mobilisation et la préparation des patients et de leurs proches; (2) la formation et la préparation du personnel à l’engagement du patient; et (3) le soutien de la Direction aux activités d’engagement traduit en ressources et en une infrastructure permettant le déroulement de ces activités (Figure 2). Au fil des projets collaboratifs de la FCASS, on a observé divers degrés et méthodes de mise en oeuvre de ces trois piliers chez les équipes désireuses de créer des environnements propices à l’engagement. Conséquemment, leurs expériences et leurs résultats se sont avérés très variables. Bien que l’ensemble des piliers constitue le fondement de l’engagement, la synergie de l’impact combiné de ces piliers contribue à susciter le changement de culture nécessaire pour soutenir les efforts de mobilisation. Le concept d’environnements propices à l’engagement s’appuie sur les nombreuses composantes complexes de la préparation au changement organisationnel : des dirigeants capables d’énoncer, de soutenir et de montrer leur engagement en faveur d’une collaboration avec les patients et leurs proches, ainsi que sa valeur, et la préparation et le renforcement de la capacité à travailler entre professionnels et patients (Weiner 2009). Un recueil de cas récent explore le concept d’environnements propices à l’engagement et décrit les divers moyens par lesquels ces piliers ont été mis en oeuvre par des organismes très performantes de l’Amérique du Nord et du Royaume-Uni (Baker et al. 2016b). Vous trouverez ci-dessous des réflexions sur les enseignements tirés de nos collaborations dans le contexte de l’évolution de notre réflexion sur les environnements propices à l’engagement au Canada et sur la façon dont la FCASS a mis ces enseignements en pratique pour devenir un organisme propice à l’engagement.

FIGURE 2. Modèles d’environnements propices à l’engagement

Figure 2

Source : Baker et Denis 2011.

Recruter et préparer le patient et sa famille : passer de « conseiller » à « partenaire » et bien plus

Au cours des huit dernières années, la FCASS a aidé des organismes à recruter et à former des patients en tant que personnes ressources en matière de priorités et d’initiatives organisationnelles. En conséquence, bien des équipes des projets collaboratifs de la FCASS, en particulier celles des premières initiatives de PEP, ont cherché à développer des infrastructures pour soutenir les pratiques d’engagement; à savoir, l’élaboration de manuels et d’outils d’orientation pour les patients, ainsi que des stratégies de recrutement et de formation pour les patients et leurs proches à titre de conseillers auprès de comités organisationnels. De plus en plus, la FCASS encourage l’instauration de modèles d’engagement plus collaboratifs (plutôt que consultatifs) afin de développer le rôle du patient en tant que partenaire et de soutenir les activités de conception conjointe. Par ailleurs, ces modèles encouragent l’engagement beaucoup plus précoce du patient aux processus afin de déterminer les priorités organisationnelles selon ses besoins, objectifs et expériences.

Le développement des rôles de conseiller ou de partenaire représente une stratégie importante pour soutenir les initiatives d’engagement du patient qui est à la fois symbolique (c.-à-d. l’importance d’inclure la voix du patient et sa présence visible pour rappeler son rôle central dans les soins de santé) et fonctionnelle (c.-à-d. la capacité à concevoir conjointement des initiatives avec l’engagement du patient en tant qu’acteur clé du processus). Cependant, il existe un réel danger si l’engagement n’est pas authentique et que l’inclusion du patient en tant que conseiller ou partenaire n’est qu’un geste purement symbolique voulant qu’il soit inclus, mais que ses opinions ne soient pas prises en compte. Les exigences législatives ou politiques d’inclusion du patient dans le processus peuvent encourager des efforts symboliques si les organismes ne sont pas entièrement préparés à participer. Bien que la FCASS ait demandé l’inclusion de conseillers et encouragé leur participation plus complète aux équipes d’amélioration de la qualité en tant que patients partenaires, elle a pris plus pleinement conscience qu’il existait une « mosaïque » d’activités de mobilisation (Tritter et McCallum 2006) et a cherché à bonifier le rôle de conseiller / partenaire en favorisant d’autres possibilités d’engagement qui font davantage appel à l’expérience du patient dans l’ensemble de l’organisme pour un ensemble plus vaste de problèmes et d’éventuelles solutions. Par exemple, dans le cadre d’un projet collaboratif de la FCASS, l’Hôpital Bruyère à Ottawa a invité des patients et proches ressources (PPR) à concevoir conjointement un « passeport vers le domicile » dans le cadre de son initiative d’amélioration des transitions de soins (CFHI 2016). L’hôpital a eu recours à plusieurs modalités d’engagement, au-delà de l’inclusion de PPR dans l’équipe d’amélioration. Bruyère a mesuré et rassemblé l’expérience de patients à divers stades de la transition et a régulièrement interrogé des patients qui recevaient actuellement des soins. Cette méthode a permis d’élargir la compréhension de l’expérience du patient en matière de transitions de soins, tout en collaborant avec les PPR pour concevoir de nouveaux processus et ressources en vue de soutenir les patients et leurs proches dans leur transition vers le domicile. Le travail de Bruyère avec des patients ressources en tant que membres de l’équipe a conduit à des solutions conçues conjointement; les autres stratégies d’engagement ont permis de contribuer des voix plus diversifiées aux travaux. L’utilisation d’un éventail de méthodes réduit non seulement la hiérarchie des méthodes d’engagement, qui suppose que l’une est préférable aux autres, mais reconnaît également que diverses méthodes d’engagement sont nécessaires selon l’objectif visé (Tritter et McCallum 2006). Une formulation claire du but de l’engagement (à savoir, pourquoi les patients participent) est essentielle pour préciser les attentes en matière d’engagement et d’influence sur les processus décisionnels.

Le recours à de nombreuses méthodes d’engagement (des méthodes de consultation telles que des groupes de discussion ou des sondages, jusqu’aux méthodes plus collaboratives, telles que des patients partenaires dans l’équipes d’amélioration) atténue également l’espoir que quelques patients retenus pour un projet puissent représenter la voix de tous les patients. Greenhalgh et ses collègues décrivent ces tensions comme la juxtaposition de la « représentation » et « représentativité »; la capacité d’inclure de nombreuses voix au moyen de diverses méthodes d’engagement visant à renforcer la compréhension de l’expérience du patient pour orienter les efforts d’amélioration (Greenhalgh et al. 2011a). Des tensions sont également soulevées concernant les patients « naïfs » par opposition aux patients « professionnalisés » qui ont acquis suffisamment de savoir-faire et de connaissances sur le fonctionnement interne du système de santé et sont donc perçus comme incapables d’apporter une perspective nouvelle ou naïve (Greenhalgh et al. 2011a; Hogg et Williamson 2001; Martin 2008). Paradoxalement, il semble que les patients constituent le seul groupe pour lequel une expérience limitée est considérée comme un atout. Encore que cela représente un casse-tête pour les patients qui se sont outillés en acquérant une connaissance du système par désir de contribuer activement à des améliorations, mais qui, ce faisant, semblent avoir trop de connaissances « d’initiés » (Barnes et Cotterell 2012). Un éventail de stratégies d’engagement permet de garantir que toute une gamme d’expériences de patients soient prises en compte tout au long du processus d’amélioration, plutôt que se fier à l’expérience d’une seule ou de quelques personnes. Les projets collaboratifs de la FCASS nous ont appris que le jumelage de patients ressources chevronnés avec des patients ressources récemment recrutés crée une alliance puissante qui permet d’aider les nouveaux patients ressources à s’y retrouver dans leurs fonctions et à acquérir les compétences nécessaires pour s’engager efficacement. Il faut souvent du temps avant que les nouveaux patients ressources se sentent à l’aise d’exprimer leur point de vue, mais leurs expériences actuelles ou récentes sont extrêmement précieuses, tout comme celles de patients ressources aguerris qui savent à quoi ressemble le partenariat véritable. Les patients et leurs familles ont encouragé le soutien entre pairs au service de l’engagement par des mécanismes formels et informels.

L’expérience croissante acquise au fil de projets collaboratifs d’apprentissage nous a également amenés à élargir nos méthodes d’engagement au-delà des rôles de conseillers et de partenaires de nos comités. Dans ses programmes les plus récents, pour veiller à tenir compte de la diversité des points de vue des patients, la FCASS a utilisé une gamme de méthodes de mobilisation de l’ensemble du continuum dont : entretiens individuels et participation à des groupes de travail avec le personnel. De même, lors de l’élaboration de politiques internes (par exemple, bourses d’études et indemnisation à l’intention de patients ou de proches), la FCASS a utilisé des méthodes telles que les twitter chats et les sondages à des fins de consultation pour mieux comprendre ce qui conviendrait le mieux aux patients, tout en dialoguant avec des patients partenaires membres de groupes de travail pour concevoir conjointement des processus et politiques.

Encourager le personnel à faire participer le patient : apprécier le pouvoir et l’identité

L’un des principaux enseignements tirés de notre première incursion dans l’engagement du patient est l’importance de préparer le personnel à interagir davantage avec les patients dans leurs efforts d’amélioration et la nécessité de procéder à une auto-évaluation honnête de l’état actuel des efforts d’engagement dans les équipes et organismes. De nombreuses équipes s’évaluaient trop favorablement quant à leur niveau actuel d’engagement et supposaient qu’elles interagissaient déjà beaucoup avec le patient. Cependant, les équipes ont souvent réalisé qu’elles avaient sous-estimé la 

Soutenir l’engagement du patient et de sa famille à l’amélioration des soins de santé

Carol Fancott et al.nécessité d’aider le personnel à apprendre comment solliciter et inclure les points de vue du patient de manière authentique dans leurs initiatives. Comprendre pourquoi l’engagement du patient est essentielle pour les pratiques centrées sur le patient est indispensable pour que le personnel reconnaisse la valeur des perspectives du patient en vue d’améliorer les processus et la prestation des soins. Les organisations qui consacrent temps, ressources et énergie à apprendre à faire participer le patient de manière authentique deviennent également plus mures dans leurs efforts de mobilisation et d’approfondissement de leurs relations avec le patient et sa famille (McIntosh-Murray et al. 2013). Des équipes provenant d’organismes telles que Huron Perth Healthcare Alliance (CFHI 2014) ont consacré beaucoup de temps et d’efforts au soutien des membres de leur personnel et de leurs équipes en vue de véritablement mobiliser les patients, faciliter les efforts visant à activement intégrer leurs points de vue dans les réunions, élaborer des solutions et définir des attentes claires par rapport au travail d’équipe. Les patients ressources ont également conjointement élaboré et dirigé des séances de formation sur l’engagement du personnel et les initiatives d’amélioration de la qualité.

Une autre équipe, du Centre universitaire de santé McGill (CUSM), a appuyé les efforts déployés par des patients, des prestataires de services et des dirigeants pour apprendre ensemble. Dans le cadre de leur initiative « Transformer les soins au chevet du patient » (CFHI 2012), les équipes cliniques et les patients ont conjointement appris et élaboré des techniques d’amélioration de la qualité au cours de leur formation. Apprendre ensemble de cette manière leur a permis d’éviter le gouffre qui les sépare souvent dans leurs efforts d’amélioration. Les patients et le personnel ont acquis ensemble de nouvelles compétences d’amélioration, brouillant ainsi les limites de leurs rôles (à savoir ceux du professionnel de la santé et ceux du patient) et réduisant la possibilité d’adopter des rôles dominants et subordonnés (Fine 1994). L’apprentissage conjoint représentait plutôt une forme « d’inclusion de l’autre » qui reconnaissait les compétences et expériences uniques de chaque membre et tissait des liens entre eux par le biais de l’apprentissage et de la formation de coalitions (Canales 2000). Comme le signalait un gestionnaire principal des soins de santé qui dirigeait une équipe dans le cadre d’un projet collaboratif de la FCASS :

C’est difficile de prendre la parole, alors je comprends pourquoi le silence peut être assourdissant : c’est toute cette question du pouvoir et de l’expertise, et de ce qui est tenu pour acquis, à savoir qui peut dire quoi, quand et qui décide de ce qui compte, quels sont les sujets de conversation. Je pense que toutes les bonnes intentions concernant l’engagement du patient, le changement réel dans les milieux de travail et notre culture échoueront, car ils ne traitent pas vraiment de certaines questions concernant le pouvoir qui sont étroitement liées à l’identité professionnelle. On sait que le travail de clinicien confère une identité fondée sur l’expertise et la compétence et que l’identité propre au patient lui attribue d’autres fonctions. Il s’avère très difficile de rompre ces a priori et, d’ailleurs, on ne sait jamais à l’avance s’il est bon de les rompre ou non. Donc, je pense que parfois, dans le mouvement d’engagement du patient, il existe un optimisme ou une conviction par rapport à l’émancipation qui veut que l’engagement du patient soit bénéfique et que l’absence de son engagement soit délétère. Or, je crois que la réalité est beaucoup plus nuancée et dépendante du contexte; qu’il est important de mieux saisir les particularités de l’identité pour dissiper les a priori.

Ainsi, la capacité d’établir des rapports et d’apprendre ensemble, en respectant et en valorisant l’expertise et l’expérience de chacun, amorce le démantèlement des hiérarchies actuelles des équipes, voire du système.

Au fur et à mesure que son expérience des éléments nécessaires à un engagement véritable s’est développée, la FCASS a déployé des efforts délibérés pour veiller à ce que le personnel ait une compréhension élémentaire qui reconnaisse au moins la valeur que les patients et leurs proches apportent à ses efforts d’amélioration et à ses programmes. Elle a recruté un patient partenaire au sein de son équipe pour faire preuve « d’inclusion de l’autre ». Essentiellement, il s’agit d’un chef de file qui dirige les efforts de renforcement des capacités, accompagne le personnel de la FCASS et engage le personnel dans l’instauration de pratiques d’engagement solides et cohérentes.

Garantir le soutien de la Direction et une orientation stratégique : faire progresser le modèle d’environnements propices à l’engagement

Les équipes qui participent aux projets collaboratifs de la FCASS ont souligné l’importance de l’appui des dirigeants pour mousser l’engagement à plusieurs niveaux de l’organisme. Les cadres supérieurs doivent « donner le ton » et proposer une orientation stratégique organisationnelle, or les dirigeants de toute initiative locale doivent encourager l’engagement du patient aux activités et aux décisions. Cette forme de leadership partagé en matière d’engagement du patient garantit la présence de ressources, de structures et d’un engagement commun à tous les niveaux de l’organisme, non pas simplement de haut en bas. Les modèles de leadership partagé sont associés à des améliorations de services et de résultats pour le patient, car les relations solides entre les dirigeants et leurs équipes constituent un facteur clé du changement (Fitzgerald et al. 2013). Le succès de l’engagement du patient est, au final, un changement de culture au sein d’un organisme qui intègre une philosophie de soins visant à valoriser et respecter les points de vue et les besoins du patient. L’engagement du patient concerne également les relations : établir, entretenir et pérenniser des relations (établir des rapports humains), une caractéristique qui exige une étude plus poussée pour qu’on puisse l’expliquer davantage au moyen du modèle d’environnements propices à l’engagement. Les interactions, la confiance et le respect qui se développent dans ces relations entre patients, personnel et dirigeants deviennent la cheville ouvrière des environnements propices à l’engagement. Ces relations fournissent une compréhension commune de l’objet, des rôles, des responsabilités et des attentes en matière d’engagement, contribuant ainsi à modifier les relations de pouvoir et à favoriser des modèles de leadership plus collaboratifs et partagés (Fitzgerald et al. 2013) qui remettent en question le statu quo, éliminent les entraves et créent de nouvelles structures qui aident les équipes, notamment les patients, à travailler de manière nouvelle et différente. Ces pratiques relationnelles nous conduiront à « un engagement et à une responsabilité relationnels pouvant déboucher sur des changements collectifs et des améliorations pour l’ensemble des soins de santé » (Plamondon et Caxaj 2018). Anya Humphrey, patiente ressource pour les travaux de la FCASS depuis la première initiative de PEP et, depuis, pour l’élaboration et l’évaluation des programmes de la FCASS, a bien présenté la notion d’engagement relationnel et, de manière plus significative, les rapports humains (encadré 3).

Que réserve l’avenir au domaine de l’engagement du patient ?

L’engagement authentique du patient à l’amélioration et à la refonte du système a été un véritable apprentissage pour la FCASS et les organismes de soins de santé du Canada; chacun étant à un stade donné du parcours. Tandis que les attentes par rapport à l’engagement du patient (aux soins, à l’amélioration des soins de santé et à l’ensemble du système de santé) continuent de s’accentuer, la FCASS maintient son soutien inébranlable à la faveur d’organismes qui s’intéressent à l’engagement du patient et redoublent d’efforts pour concrétiser ce grand projet. La création, le maintien et la pérennisation de relations entre ceux qui prodiguent et organisent les soins et ceux qui les reçoivent constituent un élément central des efforts de cette mobilisation. Ces nouvelles relations représentent un changement dans le pouvoir nécessaire à l’établissement de partenariats authentiques, ce qui entraîne inévitablement le changement de culture indispensable à l’engagement véritable. La FCASS préconise des modèles de partenariat axés sur l’engagement qui encouragent la conception conjointe tout en reconnaissant qu’une mosaïque complète de méthodes d’engagement s’impose pour efficacement mobiliser les patients. Un large éventail de méthodes permet d’inclure un grand nombre de voix et d’expériences qui, partant, influencent notre façon de penser et de comprendre l’expérience et le parcours du patient dans le système de soins de santé. À mesure que les organismes prendront de l’aisance avec l’engagement, la FCASS jouera un rôle dans le regroupement d’organismes aux vues similaires en réseaux afin d’exercer une influence croissante tout au long du parcours du patient et du continuum de soins. Des initiatives d’envergure, telles que le Collaborative Chronic Care Network de l’hôpital pour enfants de Cincinnati (Farmanova et al. 2016) montrent que des partenariats entre organismes, chercheurs, cliniciens et patients, renforcés par la technologie (pour le partage de données, d’informations, de priorités et d’expériences), peuvent entraîner des changements dans les pratiques et modèles de soins qui se traduisent par de meilleurs résultats pour le patient.

L’engagement du patient est une stratégie locale au sein des organismes, mais elle s’intègre à un mouvement social plus vaste à l’échelle du système (Bate et al. 2004; Bibby et al. 2009) au fur et à mesure que les patients et leurs familles font entendre leur expérience et leurs besoins en matière de soins. Les communications mobiles et les technologies d’apprentissage sont un facteur clé qui permet aux patients et à leurs proches de mieux contrôler leurs soins grâce au renforcement de leur compréhension et de leurs connaissances. Les liens établis au moyen des médias sociaux encouragent également les efforts de mobilisation à plus grande échelle en reliant les patients et en décloisonnant leurs activités pour affermir leur voix. La FCASS a principalement axé ses efforts sur l’engagement du patient, mais les stratégies d’engagement du public, en particulier en ce qui concerne l’établissement de priorités et l’élaboration de politiques, deviendront plus évidentes dans son travail à l’avenir.

Un soutien accru pour la recherche sur les pratiques d’engagement du patient s’impose afin d’améliorer la base de données probantes nécessaire à la démonstration de sa valeur au-delà de l’engagement en tant que « bonne ligne de conduite à suivre ». Des efforts supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour expliquer les liens entre les processus et structures d’engagement et les résultats des activités d’engagement. Il faut parvenir à comprendre ce qui fonctionne, pourquoi et avec quel effet. Bien que le domaine de l’engagement du patient s’accélère à une cadence soutenue, le travail des chercheurs sur le terrain peut contribuer à jeter un nouvel éclairage sur ce que sont les pratiques d’engagement véritable et les liens qui permettent d’améliorer les résultats et les expériences du patient. 

À la FCASS, on « apprend par la pratique »; on est conscient du cheminement nécessaire à la mobilisation et à la cohérence des pratiques tandis qu’on tâche de créer un organisme propice à l’engagement. Les enseignements tirés de ces expériences apportent de nouveaux changements, déployés avec le concours de patients partenaires, dans le but d’améliorer les expériences et les résultats du patient, de transformer le système pour qu’il soit véritablement centré sur les besoins et attentes du patient et de sa famille. 

ENCADRÉ 3. Extrait d’un discours prononcé par Anya Humphrey, patiente ressource à la FCASS, lors d’une conférence de l’IPFCC à Baltimore, au Maryland, en juin 2018

Mon mari et mon fils sont tous les deux morts d’un cancer et, bien qu’ils aient tous deux reçu d’excellents soins, leur décès ne s’est pas bien passé. Je suis donc patiente-proche ressource depuis plus de sept ans, parce que, comme beaucoup de patients ressources, sinon tous, je veux éviter aux autres de vivre une expérience similaire à celle de ma famille.

Aucun des organismes où j’ai été bénévole ne m’avait jamais proposé de jouer un rôle actif dans ses activités. Je suis privilégiée, mais je suis parfois confrontée à des circonstances difficiles, car l’engagement du patient et de sa famille est un nouveau phénomène au Canada.

J’ai travaillé en tant que patiente-proche ressource à des initiatives auprès de plusieurs organismes et, en plus des trois piliers des environnements propices à l’engagement que vous connaissez (qui étaient tous plus ou moins absents dans les projets auxquels j’ai participé qui ont échoués), j’ajouterais un autre ingrédient indispensable à la réussite; l’importance d’établir des relations interpersonnelles. Rien ne remplace le sentiment de connaître et de se savoir connu des autres. On peut s’imaginer que c’est impossible lorsqu’on siège à des comités provinciaux ou nationaux dont le travail se déroule principalement au téléphone, et que, comme patient ressource, on n’est jamais dans le même immeuble que les autres et qu’on ne fait pas partie du train-train quotidien. Or, selon mon expérience, c’est plutôt le contraire. La pratique d’organiser au moins une réunion initiale en personne pour permettre aux participants d’apprendre à se connaître est désormais courante. En pareilles circonstances, comme les participants doivent tous parcourir de longues distances, loger à l’hôtel et manger au restaurant, les occasions de réseautage ne manquent pas. Souvent, un dîner de groupe, des déjeuners et pauses-café permettent aux participants d’évoquer des enjeux de manière informelle, voire de les éviter collectivement ! Ces occasions sont inestimables pour moi. Elles me donnent l’impression de faire partie de l’équipe, d’avoir un lien direct avec les autres membres, et de savoir qui intervient lorsque j’entends une voix désincarnée au téléphone. Par ailleurs, comme je suis souvent invitée à raconter une partie de mon récit personnel lors de grands événements, j’y retrouve souvent quelqu’un que je connais, qui peut venir à mon secours avec un câlin réconfortant lorsque j’en ai besoin. Ce cas de figure c’est d’ailleurs produit il y a peu de temps et me fait toujours monter les larmes aux yeux lorsque j’y pense. Je ne saurais exprimer l’importance du réconfort que j’ai ressenti lorsque cette professionnelle de la santé a spontanément réagi à ma détresse en m’enlaçant. À mon avis, le travail qui découle de ces événements est plus profond et satisfaisant que tout ce qui se passe localement. Lorsque les membres d’un comité vivent et travaillent côte à côte, les dîners et les cafés ne sont pas partagés à moins que la Direction n’en fasse une priorité.

Un collègue patiente ressource a utilisé une citation lors d’une réunion nationale qui tape dans le mille. Elle m’a tellement impressionnée que j’ai cherché son contexte d’origine. Thomas Merton, théologien et militant, a un jour reçu une lettre d’un jeune homme qui travaillait dur pour le mouvement de la paix dans le monde et qui était devenu complètement désabusé. Merton a écrit une lettre encourageante dans laquelle il disait : « au final, c’est la réalité des relations interpersonnelles qui sauve tout. »

Il semble donc évident qu’un organisme dirigé par une personne qui traite son personnel avec respect et compassion incarne un modèle qui peut se diffuser à l’ensemble de l’établissement et au-delà des personnes qui oeuvrent dans son giron immédiat. Lorsque ce style de leadership s’installe, le ton des interactions contribue à éclairer et à orienter les activités. Les rôles que j’ai occupés au sein d’organismes de ce genre ont évolué et pris de l’ampleur au fil du temps, à mesure que nous déterminions, ensemble, quel était notre plein potentiel. Le potentiel créatif présent dans ce genre de contexte relationnel favorise des conversations intéressantes, l’émergence de nouvelles idées et même une forme d’enthousiasme à l’idée d’essayer de nouvelles choses. À bien des égards, aucun d’entre nous n’a vraiment pu se préparer à cette réalité, car nous nous aventurions essentiellement sur un terrain encore inconnu, mais dans un environnement où l’humain l’emporte sur les données et l’approche collégiale ruisselle dans tout ce que l’on fait. Et comme tout le monde incarne ces valeurs, tous les projets choisi et soutenus vont dans le même sens. À mon avis, les environnements propices à l’engagement sont ceux qui ont un coeur.

FCASS = Fondation canadienne pour l’amélioration des services de santé; IPFCC = Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care. 

Notes 

  1. Le dicton « rien sur nous sans nous » trouve ses origines dans les traditions politiques de l’Europe centrale (latin : Nihil de nobis, sine nobis). Sa formulation en anglais a été invoquée par des militants handicapés dans les années 1990. Il est aussi le titre d’un ouvrage de James Charlton sur les droits des personnes handicapées. Ce dicton a été adopté par de nombreux autres groupes d’intérêts et mouvements sociaux, notamment, dernièrement, par des patients et usagers du système de santé.

  2. Tout au long de cet article, les auteurs emploient l’expression « patient », un terme général visant à désigner toute personne ayant une expérience vécue du système de santé. Elle englobe également les termes résident, client ou usager du service. S’agissant de l’engagement du patient, celle-ci peut également inclure les proches et aidants naturels du patient.

Remerciements

Les auteurs souhaitent remercier les nombreux dirigeants, membres du personnel, formateurs, enseignants et patients ressources de la FCASS qui ont contribué à la conception, à l’élaboration, à la mise en oeuvre et à l’évaluation des initiatives de projets collaboratifs en matière d’engagement du patient et de sa famille évoquée dans cet article.

Références

Veuillez vous reporter à la liste dans la version anglaise

About the Author

Carol Fancott, PT, PhD, is director of patient and citizen engagement and northern and Indigenous health, at the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement.

G. Ross Baker, PhD, is a professor at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto and program lead in quality improvement and patient safety.

Maria Judd, BScPT, MSc, is vice president, programs, at the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement. She previously led the patient and citizen engagement portfolio at CFHI. Maria’s patient-first perspective has evolved from her diverse roles and experiences within the health system and guides her work.

Anya Humphrey is a retired psychotherapist. Motivated by the deaths of her husband and son, she is a patient/family advisor in the healthcare system, with the goal of improving care for critically ill and dying patients and their families.

Angela Morin, patient partner at the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement, has partnered with organizations at every level of healthcare as a patient advisor since 2011, after supporting her friend Bonnie through her cancer experience. She believes we are better together.

Au sujet des auteurs

Carol Fancott, PT, PhD, est dirtctrice, Engagement du patient et du citoyen et Santé du Nord et des Autochtones à la Fondation canadienne pour l’amélioration des services de santé.

G. Ross Baker, PhD, est professeur à l’Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation de l’Université de Toronto où il dirige également le programme sur l’amélioration de la qualité et la sécurité des patients.

Maria Judd, BScPT, MSc, est vice-présidente des programmes à la Fondation canadienne pour l’amélioration des services de santé. Auparavant, elle dirigeait le portefeuille de l’engagement du patient et du citoyen à la FCASS. Sa conception de la centralité du patient a évolué au fil des diverses fonctions et expériences qui ont marqué sa carrière au sein du système de santé et oriente à présent son travail.

Anya Humphrey est psychothérapeute à la retraite. Motivée par le décès de son mari et de son fils, elle est patiente-proche ressource pour le système de santé dans le but d’améliorer les soins prodigués aux patients gravement malades et mourants et à leurs proches.

Angela Morin est patiente partenaire à la Fondation canadienne pour l’amélioration des services de santé où elle collabore avec des organismes de tous les niveaux de la santé en tant que patiente ressource depuis 2011, après avoir aidé son amie Bonnie victime du cancer. Elle estime que nous sommes tous meilleurs ensemble.

Acknowledgment

The authors would like to acknowledge the many CFHI leaders, staff, coaches and faculty, and patient advisors who contributed to the design and development, implementation and/or evaluation of the patient engagement initiatives and collaboratives noted in this paper.

References

Baker, G.R. and J.-L. Denis. 2011. “Patient Engagement and System Transformation.” Presentation to Patient Engagement Workshop, Edmonton, AB, November 2011.

Baker, G.R., M. Judd, C. Fancott and C. Maika. 2016a. “Creating ‘Engagement Capable Environments’ in Healthcare.” In G.R. Baker, M. Judd and C. Maika, eds. Patient Engagement: Catalyzing Improvement and Innovation in Healthcare (pp. 11–34). Toronto, ON: Longwoods Publishing Corporation.

Baker, G.R., M. Judd and C. Maika. 2016b. Patient Engagement: Catalyzing Improvement and Innovation in Healthcare. Toronto, ON: Longwoods.

Barnes, M. and P. Cotterell. 2012. “Introduction: From Margin to Mainstream.” In M. Barnes and P. Cotterell, eds. Critical Perspectives on User Involvement. Bristol, UK: Policy Press.

Bate, P., G. Robert and H. Bevan. 2004. “The Next Phase of Healthcare Improvement: What Can We Learn from Social Movements?” BMJ Quality & Safety 13(1): 62–66.

Bibby, J., H. Bevan, E. Carter, P. Bate and G. Robert. 2009. The Power of One, the Power of Many: Bringing Social Movement Thinking to Health and Healthcare Improvement. Coventry, UK: NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement.

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI). 2012. Understanding the Care Experience through the Eyes of Patients. Retrieved July 31, 2018. <https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/OurImpact/ImpactStories/ImpactStory/2012/10/31/57a56395-5aef-4f12-b7d2-91f6eaecf42d.aspx>.

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI). 2014. “Project Engages Patients, Families and Staff to Improve Care.” Retrieved July 31, 2018. <https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/OurImpact/ImpactStories/ImpactStory/2014/03/06/project-engages-patients-families-and-staff-to-improve-care>. 

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI). 2016. “Path to Home. Bruyere Passport.” Retrieved September 25, 2018. <https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/sf-docs/default-source/hub-pe/pathtohome-passport-eng.pdf>.

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI). 2018a. How to Successfully Engage Patients and Families in Building Quality-Improvement Initiatives: 10 Insights from Healthcare Providers and Leaders. Retrieved April 4, 2018. <https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/sf-docs/default-source/patient-engagement/pe-patient-tip-sheet-from-providers-e.pdf?sfvrsn=1456a944_2>.

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI). 2018b. How to Successfully Engage Patients and Families in Building Quality-Improvement Initiatives: 10 Lessons Learned from Patient and Family Advisors. Retrieved April 4, 2018. <https://www.cfhi-fcass.ca/sf-docs/default-source/patient-engagement/pe-patient-tip-sheet-from-advisors-e.pdf?sfvrsn=1956a944_2>.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). 2018. “Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research.” Retrieved July 31, 2018. <http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/41204.html>.

Canales, M.K. 2000. “Othering: Toward an Understanding of Difference.” Advances in Nursing Science 22(4): 16–31.

Carman, K.L., P. Dardess, M. Maurer, S. Sofaer, K. Adams, C. Bechtel et al. 2013. “Patient and Family Engagement: A Framework for Understanding the Elements and Developing Interventions and Policies.” Health Affairs 32(2): 223–31. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2012.1133.

Edmondson, A.C., R.M. Bohmer and G.P. Pisano. 2001. “Disrupted Routines: Team Learning and New Technology Implementation in Hospitals.” Administrative Science Quarterly 46(4): 685–716. doi:10.2307/3094828.

Farmanova, E., M. Judd, P. Margolis, J. Vandergrift and M. Seid. 2016. “Collaborative Chronic Care Network (C3N).” In G.R. Baker, M. Judd and C. Maika, eds., Patient Engagement: Catalyzing Improvement and Innovation in Healthcare (pp. 87–92). Toronto, ON: Longwoods Publishing Corporation.

Fine, M. 1994. “Working the Hyphens: Reinventing Self and Other in Qualitative Research.” In N.K. Denzin & Y.S. Lincoln, eds., Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Fitzgerald, L., E. Ferlie, G. McGivern and D. Buchanan. 2013. “Distributed Leadership Patterns and Service Improvement: Evidence and Argument from English Healthcare.” Leadership Quarterly 24(1): 227–39. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2012.10.012.

Greenhalgh, T., F. Woodard and C. Humphrey. 2011a. “Inherent Tensions in Involving Users.” In T. Greenhalgh, C. Humphrey and F. Woodard, eds., User Involvement in Health Care. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Greenhalgh, T., C. Humphrey and F. Woodard. 2011b. User Involvement in Health Care. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Hogg, C. and C. Williamson. 2001. “Whose Interests Do Lay People Represent? Towards an Understanding of the Role of Lay People as Members of Committees.” Health Expectations 4(1): 2–9.

Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on Quality of Health Care in America. 2001. Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: National Academies Press (US).

International Association for Public Participation (IAP2). 2015. “Public Participation Spectrum.” Retrieved August 12, 2018. <https://cdn.ymaws.com/www.iap2.org/resource/resmgr/foundations_course/IAP2_P2_Spectrum_FINAL.pdf>.

Judd, M., G.R. Baker, C. Fancott, E. Farmanova and C. Maika. 2015. Patient Engagement: Catalyzing Improvement and Innovation in Canadian Healthcare. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement.

Karazivan, P., V. Dumez, L. Flora, M.-P. Pomey, C. Del Grande, D.P. Ghadiri et al. 2015. “The Patient-as-Partner Approach in Health Care: A Conceptual Framework for a Necessary Transition.” Academic Medicine 90(4): 437–41. doi:10.1097/ACM.0000000000000603.

Martin, G.P. 2008. “‘Ordinary People Only’: Knowledge, Representativeness, and the Publics of Public Participation in Healthcare.” Sociology of Health and Illness 30(1): 35–54. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9566.2007.01027.x.

McIntosh-Murray, A., G.R. Baker, J.L. Denis and M.P. Pomey. 2013. Patient Engagement Project (PEP) Teams – Wave Two Qualitative Study: Phase 3 Report. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement.

Orchard, C.A., G.A. King, H. Khalili and M.B. Bezzina. 2012. “Assessment of Interprofessional Team Collaboration Scale (AITCS): Development and Testing of the Instrument.” Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions 32(1): 58–67.

Plamondon, K. and S. Caxaj. 2018. “Toward Relational Practices for Enabling Knowledge-to-Action in Health Systems: The Example of Deliberative Dialogue.” Advances in Nursing Science 41(1): 18–29. doi:10.1097/ANS.0000000000000168.

Shortell, S., J.A. Marsteller, M. Lin, M.L. Pearson, S.Y. Wu, P. Mendel et al. 2004. “The Role of Perceived Team Effectiveness in Improving Chronic Illness Care.” Medical Care 42(11): 1040–48.

Tambuyzer, A., G. Pieters and C. Van Audenhove. 2014. “Patient Involvement in Mental Health Care: One Size Does Not Fit All.” Health Expectations 17(1): 138–50. doi:10.1111/j.1369-7625.2011.00743.x.

Tritter, J.Q. and A. McCallum. 2006. “The Snakes and Ladders of User Involvement: Moving Beyond Arnstein.” Health Policy 76(2): 156–68.

Valente, T.W. 2010. Social Networks and Health: Models, Methods, and Applications. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Weiner, B.J. 2009. “A Theory of Organizational Readiness for Change.” Implementation Science 4: 67. doi:10.1186/1748-5908-4-67.

Comments

Be the first to comment on this!

Note: Please enter a display name. Your email address will not be publically displayed